SAT Words

Week of 11-12-18

Resolution-

“rez-o-loo-shun”

-noun

a promise to yourself to do or to not do something

My new year’s resolution was to earn a 4.0 on my report cards for this school year.

Scapegoat-

“Skape-gote”

-noun

person on whom blame is placed for faults of others

The captain was made a scapegoat for the team’s failure in the competition.

Inclination-

“In-klin-a-shun”

-noun

Tendencies;  leaning towards something

The scientists decided to agree with the data and not with any inclinations or hunches.

Devoured-

“Dee-vow-erd”

verb

Greedily eaten or consumed

The vicious lion devoured its prey within minutes.

Anarchy

“Ann-ar-kee”

-noun

Lack of government or lawlessness due to lack of government

When the old regime fell, there was anarchy in the streets.

SAT Words of the Week for 11-5-18

  Tirade

 “Tie-rade”

 -noun

 A long and angry speech

The coach went on a tirade after the players on the team were fooling around and not trying their best during practice.

 Obsolete

 

“Ob-so-leet”

 -adjective

Does not exist anymore ..OR.. no longer used

 I was told that my old printer is obsolete and I can not order replacement parts since they are not made anymore.

Hinder

“Hin-dur”

-verb

 

To make difficult..OR.. to slow down the process of something

The cold and wet weather hindered my ability to get to work on time since the roads were very icy.

Brevity –

 “brev-it-ee”

  -noun

 Using few words to explain something

The brevity of the presentation was appreciated by the busy and anxious staff members.

Pontificate-

“pon-tiff-e-kate”

-verb

To speak about something as if you are always right

The woman was tired of listening to her mother-in- law who pontificates about how to raise children well.

SAT Words of the Week for 10-22-18

A

damant-

“add-e-ment”

-adjective

Unwilling to change one’s thoughts, beliefs, or ideas regarding an issue; inflexible

If you stubbornly refuse to change your mind about something, you are adamant about it.

 Brawny-

“braw-nee”

-adjective

Strong and muscular

The bodybuilders were comparing the size of their brawny shoulders during the competition.

Decathlon-

“Dee-kath-lon”

-noun

An athletic competition that is comprised of ten track and field events and the competitor with the highest combined points is the winner.

The winner of the decathlon was especially proud of his performance in the high jump competition.

Hieroglyphics-

“Hi-er-glif-iks”

-noun

Picture writing

The hieroglyphics on the walls in the Great Pyramids  showed the lifestyle of the pharaoh of Egypt as well as his family.

SAT Words for the week of Oct. 15th

 

Thwart-

“th-wurt”

To prevent something from occurring

The mother thwarted the plans of her son from sneaking out of the house at night.

Braggart-

“brag-ert”

Someone who boasts or excessively compliments himself or herself .

The president of the company was looked upon as a braggart when boasting about his own wealth and power.

 

Debunk-

“dee-bunk”

To expose false claims or myths

The lawyer debunked the defendant’s claim that he     was not at the scene of the crime.

Restorative-

“re-store-a-tiv”

To restore, repair, or renew something

The idea of Restorative Justice is to move beyond simple punishment and retribution in sentencing and to give the crime victims a voice.

Languish-“lang-wish” To continue for a long period of time in an unwanted and an undesirable circumstanceThe elderly residents were languishing during the prolonged heat wave without air conditioning.

Acuity-

“e-qu-it-ee”

The ability to see, hear, or understand something easily

My grandfather lost the acuity of his hearing over the years.

Epitomized-

“e-pit-e-mized”

To be the perfect example or representation of something

The well behaved students epitomized the school’s core values.

SAT Words for the week of Oct. 8th, 2018

Week of 10-8-18

Ecstatic-

“ek-sta-tick”

Overwhelmed with joy and emotion

The students were ecstatic when their team won the championship game in the last minute.

Therapeutic-

“thare- a pew- tik”

Having healing or calming properties

The mint oil rub was therapeutic to the elderly man’s sore back.

Poised-

“poy-sd”

Calm, graceful, or having good composure

The track star was poised and ready to sprint in the short distance race.

Admonish-

“add-mon-ish

To scold, reprimand, or firmly warn someone

The assistant principal admonished the loud group of students about making excessive noises in the hallways during school hours.

Debility-

“di-bill-it-ee”

Having a weakness or incapacity

Debility caused by the car accident prevented her from being able to get out of bed this morning.

SAT Words for the week of Oct. 1, 2018

 

Acrophobia-      

“ak-ro-foe-bee-ya”

An abnormal fear of heights

Someone who is terrified to go to the top floor is an example of acrophobia.

Accommodate-

 “a-kom-e-date”

To fit in the wishes or needs of someone

The hospitable couple was happy to accommodate the needs of their guests.

Accessible-

“ak-ses-i-bil”

Easy to reach or approach

The town is accessible by bus or taxi.

Adv

antageous-

“ad-van-tage-is”

Giving an advantage to or creating favorable circumstances

The house’s location in the best school district was advantageous to the seller.

Dubious-

“doo-bee-is”

Not to be relied on OR doubtful

Mrs. Jones thought the student had a dubious story of being sick after she saw the student playing football on the playground right after class ended.

Sat Words of the Week of Sept. 24, 2018

Lance- “lans” spear; spike; javelinThe knight held a sharp lance during the battle.
Obscure- “ub-skyoor”

difficult to understand; partially hidden

It has been immensely frustrating that the truth in the case has remained obscure for so long.

Poignant- “poin-yent”

deeply moving; strongly affecting the emotions

One of the most poignant stories in the news last week was about a little boy who lost his entire family in the war.

Respite – “res-pit”

a break; intermission

Finally, the public will experience a respite from the Trump and Clinton campaigns after the elections take place in November.

 

Terse – “turs”

concise; to the point

She had earlier offered a terse description of how the car accident occurred as she texted while driving.

SAT Words of the Week

for September 17, 2018

Subsequent- “sub-see-kwent”

coming after something in time  

Subsequent editions of the book will be based on the early lives of the characters.

Boorish-  “boo-rish”

ill-mannered

The boorish behavior of the child in the store was a result of him being tired and bored.

Cynical- “sin-i-kal”

believing that people act only out of selfish motives

The new car buyer was very cynical of the sales pitch

Epistle- “ih-pis-ol”

a letter (form of communication), usually referring to an extract from the New Testament

The reverend referred to the epistle in his Sunday sermon.

Heresy- “hair-e-see”

 against orthodox opinion

He committed Republican heresy by saying revenue    needs to be part of any deficit solution.

 

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